Bill Meyer: Year In Review 2017

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Dusted’s writers bid 2016 farewell with a mixture of sadness
and revulsion. We grieved the many great musicians who died, but the sense that
the countries we live in were collectively embracing paths that might make us
mourn the toppling of fundamental principals weighed even heavier. And 2017 has
shown that our dismay was not misplaced. There’s no need to recount the shit
show of USA politics here, except to say that it’s fucking embarrassing to know
that a sizable portion of your country is swallowing scams so transparent that if
your teenager pulled that crap on you, you’d ground them an extra week just for
thinking you were that dumb. But while compassion, justice, and reality contact
seem to have gone out the window, I’ve never found music more sustaining. So
let’s talk about what gives a guy hope.  

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Listening Post:  The Fall Singles Box Set

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Over nearly four decades, 32 studio albums, around a dozen labels and a
dizzying array of line-ups, the Fall has been a source of endless fascination,
amusement, irritation, astonishment and enjoyment to a healthy minority of
Dusted writers.  Centered around the irascible,unpredictable,
absolutely inimitable Mark E. Smith, the Fall has been churning out singles
since most of us started buying them, and, unlike other youthful obsessions,
continues to do so, right up to the current moment.  So, when we heard that Cherry Red was putting
out a massive seven-disc, 117-track singles collection, we were intrigued.  We were also a little daunted.  We decided to listen to it together, or at
least at the same time, as much as we could, and talk about it in this listening
post. As usual, some of us were long-time fans, others were new to the Fall and
a couple were, shall we say, not convinced. Contributors included Jennifer
Kelly, Bill Meyer, Justin Cober-Lake, Ben Donnelly, Ian Mathers, Mason Jones,
Michael Rosenstein and Marc Medwin.  

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Joe McPhee – The Willisau Concert (Hat Hut/Corbett vs. Dempsey)

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Numerous
are the musicians who adopt the DIY tack and launch record labels to document
their work. Relatively few are those that can claim an enterprise founded by
others with the express purpose of releasing their music. Joe McPhee holds that
latter distinction thanks to Werner X Uehlinger and the Hat Hut imprint. Up to
1975, McPhee had been dividing his time between occasional teaching engagements
at Vassar College and a day gig at a factory in his hometown of Poughkeepsie,
NY, fitting music into the time between and off from both. The Willisau Concert, Uehlinger’s second release on his fledgling
label, documents an eponymous Swiss leg of a European tour undertaken by McPhee
and his colleague John Synder in the fall of that year. South African drummer Makaya
Ntshoko joined the group, but the chemistry between the three players was
apparently off leading to a truncating of the tour soon after.

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V India hraje na kytaru Tomáš Kopáček (Black Tar Jesus,…

V India hraje na kytaru Tomáš Kopáček (Black Tar Jesus, Tempelhof, Latviri…) a svoji už tak legendární kytarovou hru po odchodu do Budějic přetransformoval na úroveň monstrum a k sobě si přibral dva (skoro) lokální klasiky: Sokola (Nuly, Microvomit…) a Bejbiše (DAT, Benelux, Kidney Trauma…). S repetitivním kytarovým zvukem u nás pracuje málokdo lépe než právě India, energická intenzivní nálož ale opouští hranice žánru a je schopná zaujmout širší nezávislou posluchačskou scénu. Space rock, woodstock, krautrock.

https://stoned-to-death.bandcamp.com/album/india-2

SUPPORT: Jakub Šimanský
Lehké pocukávání koutků vetřelce, putujícího v zemi, kde Fahey je králem.

https://soundcloud.com/jakubsimansky
https://stoned-to-death.bandcamp.com/album/face-to-face-against-american-primitivism-in-eastern-europe-vol-i